International Journal of Asian Social Science

Published by:
Asian Economic and Social Society 

Online ISSN: 2224-4441
Print ISSN: 2226-5139
Total Citation: 940

No. 5

How Distant is Climate Change? Construal Level Theory Analysis of German and Taiwanese Students Statements

Pages: 434-447
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How Distant is Climate Change? Construal Level Theory Analysis of German and Taiwanese Students Statements

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.434.447

Corinna De Guttry , Martin Doring , Beate Ratter

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(2017). How Distant is Climate Change? Construal Level Theory Analysis of German and Taiwanese Students Statements. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 434-447. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.434.447
The usefulness of Construal Level Theory to understand how people mentally represent climate change has been recognized by a number of authors in recent years. Yet, empirical studies that analyse both psychological distance and construal levels of climate change are still rare. We fill this gap by investigating the perceived geographical, temporal and social dimensions of climate change and by analyzing the construal levels employed by the participants of our research. Participants comprise two groups of university students (in Taiwan and in Germany) that carried out a 10 Statements Test on climate change. Results suggest that climate change is still perceived as distant. Nevertheless, we identified differences between the two groups in the construal levels employed. We reflect on the role of culture in the choice of different construal, on the potentials of Construal Level Theory to systematically analyse individuals? understandings of climate change and we illustrate the implications of our results for future climate communication strategies.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated cultural differences in construal levels and psychological distances of climate change. To do so, it provides in depth empirical analysis of climate change perception based on Construal Level Theory.

Analysis of Inequality in Healthcare Utilization among Pregnant Women in Nigeria: Concentration Index Approach

Pages: 424-433
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Analysis of Inequality in Healthcare Utilization among Pregnant Women in Nigeria: Concentration Index Approach

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.424.433

David-Wayas, Onyinye , Ugbor, I. Kalu , Arua Martha , Nwanosike, Dominic U

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(2017). Analysis of Inequality in Healthcare Utilization among Pregnant Women in Nigeria: Concentration Index Approach. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 424-433. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.424.433
Social inequalities in health care are considered to arise from social and economic determinants outside the health care services. There is an increasing interest in the role of the health care system. It is generally assumed that socioeconomic gradients in access to health care are very high, but only recently has this been subject to critical review. This study adopts health concentration index as a measure of inequalities in health status among pregnant women in Nigeria. The study observes that socioeconomic inequalities in healthcare utilization in Nigeria can be attributed to the high level of poverty in the country, as a major barrier that discourages household from gaining access to health care services. For healthcare utilization among pregnant women in Nigeria to be effective, the study suggests for interventions in order to promote maternal health care service utilization among pregnant women in Nigeria.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes to the existing literature on analysis of inequality among pregnant women utilization of health care services in Nigeria. Health concentration index was adopted as a measure of inequalities in health status among pregnant women in Nigeria. The findings show that socioeconomic inequalities in healthcare utilization in Nigeria can be attributed to the high level of poverty in the country.

Multidimensional Overlapping Deprivation Analysis of Children in District Sargodha (Pakistan)

Pages: 410-423
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Multidimensional Overlapping Deprivation Analysis of Children in District Sargodha (Pakistan)

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.410.423

Sarwat Shabir , Faiz ur Rahim

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(2017). Multidimensional Overlapping Deprivation Analysis of Children in District Sargodha (Pakistan). International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 410-423. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.410.423
This study provides estimates of multidimensional child deprivation in Tehsil Kot Momin, District Sargodha. National Multidimensional Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (N-MODA) Methodology introduced by United Nations International Children?s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) is adopted in this study. Children are divided into two age groups, below 5 years of age and 5 to 17 years of age for analysis of seven multi-dimensions and six multi-dimensions of deprivations in both groups respectively. A survey is conducted in Kot Momin from sample of 387 children selected through cluster sampling. Selection of dimensions and indicators for survey questionnaire are also based on UNICEF and Children Rights Conference (CRC) and step by step guideline of MODA methodology.  In children of first age group 92.78% are deprived in at least one basic dimension. At the cutoff point (deprivation benchmark) of this age group, 47.42% are deprived in four or more dimensions, while one out of ten children (10.4%) is deprived in six dimensions. In children of second age group 76.4% are deprived in at least one basic dimension and at cut off point (deprived in three or more dimensions) around one in four (25.8%) children is deprived. Overall results show that the first age group had more vulnerable condition.
Contribution/ Originality
This is a unique study on poverty which makes an overlapping derivation analysis. The dimensions and indicators of poverty have been calculated using most sophisticated tools adopted by UNICEF and Children Rights Conference (CRC) by applying MODA methodology. This is one of the very few studies which have tested most advanced techniques in the least developed areas of Pakistan. The findings will help decision makers in tackling problem of poverty and deprivation in a single go.

The Effectiveness of Teaching Educational Research Course on the Development of Scientific Research Skills, Academic and Personal Integrity among Female Students of Al-Qassim University

Pages: 392-409
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The Effectiveness of Teaching Educational Research Course on the Development of Scientific Research Skills, Academic and Personal Integrity among Female Students of Al-Qassim University

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.392.409

Lawaheth M. T.Hussein

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(2017). The Effectiveness of Teaching Educational Research Course on the Development of Scientific Research Skills, Academic and Personal Integrity among Female Students of Al-Qassim University. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 392-409. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.392.409
The present study aims to explore   the effectiveness of teaching educational research course on the development of the scientific research skills as well as the academic and personal integrity among the female students of Al-Qasim University, department of family and childhood sciences. The sample of the study consists of (45) female students who study the educational research course at the department of family and childhood science, the first term of the academic year 2016/2017CE. To achieve the aims of the current study, three measures have been designed. 1) an  integrity questioner consisting of (37) items.2) a questioner consisting  of ( 51) items  to measure  the personal integrity.3) an achievement test consisting of ( 34) items in form of multiple choices that cover the main dimensions of  the scientific research skills in the educational research :collecting data, steps of scientific research implementation , writing of scientific research . The three measures have been applied before and after teaching the course at the end of the first term. The outcomes of the study have shown that there are statistically significant differences between the two mean scores of students on the test of the scientific research before and after teaching the course in favor of the post- test. The mean scores of the pre-application has reached (10.87), whereas the mean scores of the post-application stand at (25.82). The outcomes also have revealed that there are  statistically  significant differences  at  the (0.01) level between the two averages  of students grades on the post and pre- test of the academic integrity values in favor of  the post- test due to the educational research course , the amount of effect is (0.802 ).  Additionally, there are significant differences  at  the (0.01) level between the two mean scores  of students in the post and pre- test of the personal  integrity values in the favor of  the post- test, the amount of effect is (0.782 ). Pearson Correlation Coefficient has been used to reveal the relation significance between student?s grades on the post- test of the academic integrity values and the personal integrity values. The value of correlation coefficient equals (0.588 ), which is a value of statistical significance at (0.01) level. This confirms that the development of the academic integrity values is associated with the development of the personal integrity values, and vice versa. 
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the effectiveness of teaching educational research course on the development of the scientific research skills as well as the academic  and personal integrity among the female students of Al-Qasim University , department of family and childhood sciences for the aim of spreading the culture  the academic integrity values among the university of students in Kingdome of Saudi Arabia.

The Power of Narrative and Local Tradition in International Health Development: Reducing the Incidence of Malaria among Three Villages in SE Asia

Pages: 381-391
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The Power of Narrative and Local Tradition in International Health Development: Reducing the Incidence of Malaria among Three Villages in SE Asia

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.381.391

Ellen A. Herda , Valerie G. Dzubur

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(2017). The Power of Narrative and Local Tradition in International Health Development: Reducing the Incidence of Malaria among Three Villages in SE Asia. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 381-391. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1.2017.75.381.391
International development is at the center of efforts to reduce poverty worldwide.  Most development projects are based on the idea that economic growth results in poverty reduction. Economic growth, a laudable goal, cannot alone serve as the most important marker for sustainable development, as noted by the lack of progress in reaching the Millennium Development Goals in 2015. We argue the case for more culturally and socially centered purposes to inform the development act. There needs to be a broader research and development base for the developer as we increasingly recognize the tyranny of poverty plaguing millions. The traditional development format relies on an epistemological framework for determining needs and for measuring success. As anthropologists, we introduce an ontological and interpretive framework, grounded in critical hermeneutics, exemplified by a health project carried out among three Ahka farming villages in SE Asia, the goal of which was to reduce the incidence of malaria, which prevented the locals from working in their fields. Cultural difference come into play when we enter the development act as do people?s narratives, imagination, ceremonies, and understanding. The over use of the economic paradigm centered on sets of technical principles does not reach into the heart of on-the-ground projects where the recipient population together  understands, imagines, and celebrates new ideas and actions. Moving successfully within different cultures requires a certain degree of complexity and dynamism that allows us to escape overly simple ordering principles and algorithms, and yet affords the developer to carry out research and practice with a focus. Sustainability, marked by living with dignity and purpose, includes actions that make sense to the local population, rather than only to the developers.
Contribution/ Originality
This study, one of very few, demonstrates the viability of critical hermeneutics as a foundation for research, planning and implementation in international development. In distinction to traditional development, it illustrates the creative power of narrative and social imaginary unleashed through conversations with local populations who fully participate in the development act.

Selected Physiological Profile among Malaysian 3rd Tier Fam League Football Players

Pages: 372-380
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Selected Physiological Profile among Malaysian 3rd Tier Fam League Football Players

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1/2017.7.5/1.5.372.380

Mohd Syafiq Miswan , Norasrudin Sulaiman

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(2017). Selected Physiological Profile among Malaysian 3rd Tier Fam League Football Players. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 372-380. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1/2017.7.5/1.5.372.380
The purpose of this study was to determine physiological profile of body composition, power, speed, agility, VO₂max, anaerobic capacity and muscular endurance of Malaysian 3rd tier football league players based on four different positions named goalkeepers, defenders, midfielders and strikers. An ex post facto design was employed. Twenty eight [ n: 28; mean (?SD) age 24.78 (?3.28); height 172.69 (?4.63) cm; and weight 71.19 (? 8.42) kg]  of footballers of Sime Darby FC participated with different positions of play in the field (goalkeeper: 4, defender: 11, midfielder: 8, striker: 5). The fitness testing involved were anthropometrics which include skinfold test, squat vertical jump, 30 meters maximal sprint, Illinois agility run test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test, repeated sprint ability test, and maximum push up test. All testing were in accordance to standard procedures. Inferential analysis was carried out using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc to reveal the sources of significant with p<.05 denoting significant. Goalkeepers were observed in their best performance in terms of height, weight, body fat percentages and lean body weight; and also best performance in peak power of squat jump and anaerobic capacity in terms of fatigue index. Defenders were observed in their best performance in terms of height and relative power of squat jump; and muscular endurance. Midfielders were observed in their highest distance and VO?max of aerobic capacity. Strikers were observed in their best performance in speed and agility and anaerobic power in terms of best and mean time score. The overall findings did not reveal the significant difference in height, body fat percentages, power, speed, and aerobic capacity. However, the significant difference was found in body weight and lean body weight between goalkeeper (p: 0.037) vs midfielder (p: 0.033) respectively. The significant difference was observed in agility between goalkeeper vs defender (p: 0.001), midfielder (p: 0.000) and striker (p: 0.000), and respectively; and defender vs striker (p: 0.001). It also showed the significant difference in RSA mean time score between goalkeeper vs defender (p: 0.013), midfielder and striker, (p: 0.020) and (p: 0.046) respectively. All parameters met the assumption of homogeneity and demonstrated the moderate level of power estimation based on Omega-square index. There were general similarities among members of the team, probably the result of a typical common training programme of the team. The significant difference found in weight, lean body weight, agility and anaerobic power in terms of mean score parameters were insightful with regards to specific fitness requirement based on different playing positions on other health and skill related to the aspect of the games.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes on existing literature about the important of understanding physiological characteristics between positions in football match in Malaysia Super League 3rd Tier perspective. This can lead to a better selection and training of player process accordingly and improve overall Malaysia football League Performance.

Investigating the Effect of Health Status on Unemployment

Pages: 367-371
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Investigating the Effect of Health Status on Unemployment

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1/2017.7.5/1.5.367.371

Abdalali Monsef , Abolfazl Shah Mohammadi Mehrjardi

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(2017). Investigating the Effect of Health Status on Unemployment. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 367-371. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1/2017.7.5/1.5.367.371
According to the economic literature, Human capital can be considered as essential factor for economic development of countries such as labour force, capital, land and management. So that economists have known it as the motor of development. In the existing studies, education and health are introduced as two main aspects of human capital. In addition to the direct effect of education and health on economic growth, these factors can reduce the unemployment by improving the labour productivity, a subject which has been considered in few studies especially about health. In this study we focus on the effects of these factors on unemployment in 117 countries over the period 2005?2013 using panel data method. To do this, the life expectancy and education index are selected as proxies for human capital. The results show that there is a negative relationship between life expectancy and unemployment but, the effect of expected years of schooling as well as increase in mean years of schooling on unemployment is positively significant. In addition, the impacts of inflation and per capita gross national income on unemployment are negative and significant as well.
Contribution/ Originality
In this study we focus on the effects of health status on unemployment in 117 countries over the period of 2005–2013 using panel data method. In addition to the direct effect of health on economic growth, this factor can reduces the unemployment by improving the labor productivity. In this viewpoint, this study is different from previous literature.

The Socioeconomic Factors that Determine Women Utilization of Healthcare Services in Nigeria

Pages: 359-366
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The Socioeconomic Factors that Determine Women Utilization of Healthcare Services in Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.1/2017.7.5/1.5.359.366

Ugbor, I. Kalu , David-Wayas, Onyinye M. , Arua, Martha , Nwanosike, Dominic U.

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(2017). The Socioeconomic Factors that Determine Women Utilization of Healthcare Services in Nigeria. International Journal of Asian Social Science, 7(5): 359-366. DOI: 10.18488/journal.1/2017.7.5/1.5.359.366
Measures of maternal deaths are critical as they reflect a woman?s access to essential services during pregnancy, childbirth, general health, nutritional status, getting  to reproductive care services as way as family planning. The  indices such as economic status, education, birth level, and birth interval are key predictors of health services utilization. Given the inequalities in healthcare utilization in developing nations, the study looks at what determines pregnant women utilization of such services in Nigeria. Adopting Poisson Regression Model on Demographic Health Survey (DHS) data, the study observes that the wealth of pregnant women positively influences their health care utilizations while an increase in the household size has a negative effect on the capability to access health care. In line with the findings, the study suggests need for positive policies and implementation strategies that will increase the opportunity for women to have proper health education which would have an impact on utilization of antenatal visits among pregnant women in Nigeria.
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes to the existing literature on the socioeconomic factors that determine women utilization of health care services in Nigeria.