Asian Development Policy Review

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Online ISSN: 2313-8343
Print ISSN: 2518-2544
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No.2

Which Factors Affect Probability of Women Using Prenatal Care? The Case of Bangladesh


Pages: 39-46
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Which Factors Affect Probability of Women Using Prenatal Care? The Case of Bangladesh

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 Sharjil Muktafi Haque --- A. K. Enamul Haque
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 Sharjil Muktafi Haque --- A. K. Enamul Haque (2014). Which Factors Affect Probability of Women Using Prenatal Care? The Case of Bangladesh. Asian Development Policy Review, 2(2): 39-46. DOI:
This paper determines the probability of women in Bangladesh taking prenatal care based on changes in socioeconomic and health-related variables. Insight into factors affecting prenatal care usage will help policy-makers redirect health-related strategies and policies in more equitable directions. We used a total of 1,099 cross-sectional observations from Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (2000) to estimate a logistic regression model. Our results show that education and income is positively associated with odds of women taking prenatal care while increase in age reduces odds of taking this service. We end by making several policy-relevant recommendations. 
Contribution/ Originality
The study contributes to the existing literature by utilizing a dataset new to the context of analyzing determinants of prenatal care in Bangladesh and confirming the impact of several variables on prenatal care usage.
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Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria


Pages: 20-38
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Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria

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Wumi Olayiwola --- Henry Okodua --- Evans S. Osabuohien
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Wumi Olayiwola --- Henry Okodua --- Evans S. Osabuohien (2014). Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria. Asian Development Policy Review, 2(2): 20-38. DOI:
Finance is generally regarded as important for economic growth, but the role of finance in economic growth is a controversial issue in the economic literature. The concept of ?finance for growth? refocuses the relationship between finance and economic growth by redirecting the role of government policies in finance, and recognizes how finance without frontiers is changing what government policies can do and achieve. The focus of this paper is not to join the debate, nor to analyse the impact of financial development on economic growth, but to discuss the concept of ?finance for growth? within the context of emerging and developing economies. The increasing development needs of Emerging Market Economies (EMEs) to raise per capita income, reduce unemployment rate, construct and maintain basic infrastructure, and invest more in human capital, make the role of finance for growth in these economies indispensable. The paper reviews the financial policies in selected EMEs including: China, South Africa and Nigeria and attempts to situate the Nigerian economy among the EMEs within the context of Finance for Growth. The paper notes that financial policies designed in various EMEs had the similar goal of making the financial system to provide key financial functions. However, large differences exist in the efficiency of the financial system in each country. The paper found that what matters to economic growth is access to financial services or financial inclusion and not which sector supplies the funds. The paper suggests appropriate policy options to build confidence in the Nigerian financial system.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the concept of ―finance for growth‖ in EMEs. It approaches the problem by assessing the performance of financial policies of selected EMEs in mobilizing financial resources for economic growth, and identifying policy options necessary for achieving finance for growth.
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