Asian Economic and Financial Review

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Online ISSN: 2222-6737
Print ISSN: 2305-2147
Total Citation: 1219

No.5

Enhancing Employee Performance In Nigeria Through Efficient Time Management Frameworks


Pages: 635-647
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Enhancing Employee Performance In Nigeria Through Efficient Time Management Frameworks

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IGBOKWE-IBETO Chinyeaka Justine, EGBON Uchechi 
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IGBOKWE-IBETO Chinyeaka Justine, EGBON Uchechi  (2012). Enhancing Employee Performance In Nigeria Through Efficient Time Management Frameworks. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 2(5): 635-647. DOI:
In developing countries like Nigeria, the need for time management in organizations cannot be over emphasized. Time management helps in achieving individual and organizational goals in view of the limited amount of time available to man. The paper examines and analyses how time abundant yet scarce resources can be managed for effective and efficient employee performance. In analyzing the issues raised in the paper, we applied time management theories and approaches which enable us direct our search light on the techniques and processes of time management, as well as, the relationship between managers and subordinates as regards time management. The study revealed that organizational managers and subordinates are faced with time management problems which have created difficulties for the attainment of organizational goals. However, certain steps have to be taken to inculcate and promote the virtue of time management that can lead to employee effectiveness and efficiency in the work place. Among others, subordinates in an organization should be encouraged to ask questions and seek agreements on priorities, be prepared to compromise, if necessary in order to make the best use of time, be on guard against unscheduled visitors and telephone calls. Also meetings should be held during specific hours of the day. During other times, people should be available for regular duties at their work-places. These recommendations should be sustained overtime and should be seen as a way of life in organizations. It concludes that time an important element in organizational life, if properly managed would ensure organizational productivity and development. 

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The Impacts of Emotional Intelligence Competency on Job Satisfaction in the Service Sector: An Application on the Turkish Banking Sector


Pages: 617-634
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Nazife Orhan, Hasan Dincer 
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Nazife Orhan, Hasan Dincer  (2012). The Impacts of Emotional Intelligence Competency on Job Satisfaction in the Service Sector: An Application on the Turkish Banking Sector. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 2(5): 617-634. DOI:
Subject to the highly increased competition in almost all sectors especially in the service sector, the analysis of emotional intelligence competency and job satisfaction of employees has been one of the most crucial research subjects nowadays to get the highest productivity from employees in terms of almost all fields of the company. Since banking sector is one of the dynamic sectors that has been changed both negatively and positively due to economic crisis in different periods, this study has been applied on the banking sector.  In addition to the analysis of these two variables in terms of relationship between each other, it has been also aimed to see if the level of emotional intelligence and job satisfaction differ by state-owned and private banks. As a data collection tool in the study, questionnaire technique has been used, and findings have been obtained from 150 staff through the survey on emotional intelligence competency by Wong and Law, and the short form of Minnesota job satisfaction survey by Weiss, Davis, England, Lofquist. 

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Exchange Market Pressure In Indonesia: A Univariate Markov Switching Analysis


Pages: 603-616
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Exchange Market Pressure In Indonesia: A Univariate Markov Switching Analysis

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Unggul Heriqbaldi 
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Unggul Heriqbaldi  (2012). Exchange Market Pressure In Indonesia: A Univariate Markov Switching Analysis. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 2(5): 603-616. DOI:
The aim of this paper is to analyze the nature of exchange market pressure in the case of the Indonesian economy. More specifically, this paper aims to answer whether there is non-linearity or multiple equilibria in the EMPI. The paper relies on a univariate Markov Switching autoregressive model. The model estimation also incorporates procedures such as unit root test, diagnostic test and log likelihood ratio test, focusing on the period from January 1990 to September 2008. This paper found that a 2-state Markov switching AR(6) model of EMPI outperforms a linear autoregressive model in explaining the behavior of EMPI. The findings also suggest that the significant regime dependent intercept confirms the existence of a multiple-equilibria condition in the EMPI. The degree of uncertainty of EMPI in a volatile state was found to be much higher than in the stable state and there was also an inertia characteristic. Due to the inertia characteristic in the EMPI, the monetary authority should take into account the role of economic agents??? expectations in delivering monetary policy to stabilize the exchange rate following significant market pressure in the economy. This paper contributes by providing empirical evidence on the characteristics of EMPI in the context of the Indonesian economy. 

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Relationship between Tourism and Economic Growth: A Panel Granger Causality Approach


Pages: 591-602
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Relationship between Tourism and Economic Growth: A Panel Granger Causality Approach

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E. caglayan N. sak, K. Karymshakov
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E. caglayan N. sak, K. Karymshakov (2012). Relationship between Tourism and Economic Growth: A Panel Granger Causality Approach. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 2(5): 591-602. DOI:
This paper investigated the causal relationship between tourism revenue and gross domestic product (GDP) using the panel data of 135 countries for the period 1995???2008. For this purpose, Panel Granger causality analysis was applied to 11 groups of countries. This classification was created as America (30 countries), Asia (34 countries), Europe (37 countries), East Asia (13 countries), South Asia (6 countries), Central Asia (5 countries), Latin America & Caribbean (28 countries), Oceania (7 countries), Middle East & North Africa (11 countries), Sub Saharan Africa (24 countries) and the world (135 countries). Results indicated bidirectional causality in Europe between tourism revenue (TR) and gross domestic product (GDP). Findings showed that there is a unidirectional causality in America, Latin America & Caribbean and World from GDP to tourism revenue. While in case of East Asia, South Asia and Oceania the reverse direction of causality was found from tourism revenue to GDP. No causal relationship was found in Asia, Middle East and North Africa, Central Asia and Sub Saharan Africa.

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