International Journal of Education and Practice

Published by: Pak Publishing Group
Online ISSN: 2310-3868
Print ISSN: 2311-6897
Total Citation: 78

No. 3

Effective Application of Local Teaching Aids for Cost Control in Learning Islamic Studies in Nasarawa State, Nigeria

Pages: 40-44
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Effective Application of Local Teaching Aids for Cost Control in Learning Islamic Studies in Nasarawa State, Nigeria

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2017.53.40.44

Abdullahi Adamu Sulaiman , Muhammad Alhasan Yunus , Aliyu Umar

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(2017). Effective Application of Local Teaching Aids for Cost Control in Learning Islamic Studies in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. International Journal of Education and Practice, 5(3): 40-44. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61.2017.53.40.44
Formal Islamic Education received tremendous boost with rapid increase in the number of Schools and Teachers in the recent past in Northern Nigeria generally and Nasarawa State specifically. Predictably, Pupils enrolment also incredibly expanded. This burst of Islamic educational activities brought in its marked changes, some positive, while others negative. Thus, the rapid increase in enrolment figures and the clamour for better and quality Islamic education by educationally conscious parents began to impose pressure on available resources. Loud grumblings started to manifest from members of the public about deterioration in the quality of Islamic education offered pupils in many Islamiyyah Schools. It is in view of the above that this paper attempts to explain the use of local teaching aids for cost control in learning Islamic Studies in Nasarawa State.

Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the importance of using local teaching aids in the teaching and learning of Islamic Studies in Nasarawa State.

Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Supervising Graduate Students Enrolled in African Universities

Pages: 29-39
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Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Supervising Graduate Students Enrolled in African Universities

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2017.5.3/61.3.29.39

Bacwayo, K. E. , Nampala, P. , Oteyo, I. N.

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(2017). Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Supervising Graduate Students Enrolled in African Universities. International Journal of Education and Practice, 5(3): 29-39. DOI: 10.18488/journal.61/2017.5.3/61.3.29.39
In a globalizing economy, education is key to competitiveness and economic growth.  Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is playing catch up in terms of investing in the human capital needed to participate effectively in the world economy.  The Sub-Saharan region is currently engaged in what has been termed as a “catch-up” period as is reflected in rapid growth in investment in education at all levels, with an increased recognition over the last decade of the need for increased number of graduates at the tertiary level. This expansion has implications on the quality of training and research. Key among the factors that can help enhance quality is supervision. Currently, in many countries in SSA, graduate training and research is largely self-paid and students make significant sacrifices to obtain advanced degrees with the expectation that they would finish on time and secure lucrative careers. With this expectation, supervisors have an enormous task of ensuring quality mentoring. It is a privilege to hold a faculty position and supervise students; nonetheless, this comes with a great responsibility associated with great expectations from the students. The expectations are targeted to supervisors and the institutions of learning.  Although there is still an imbalance on power relationships between supervisors and students, especially in developing countries, supervisors still need to understand and know the student expectations. This way, they can build professionally and healthy long lasting relationships than can spread beyond the supervision period. This paper discusses the issue of supervision, with a focus on different approaches to delivering quality supervision, students’ needs and expectations, and how these can be addressed based on authors’ experiences working at universities from a developing country perspective.
Contribution/ Originality
This paper presents an extensive review that faculty and students will find handy as part of quality graduate training. With the increasing number of graduate students, higher education institutions must hone their role and provide both ethical and leadership to mold excellence in graduate students.