Animal Review

Publish by: Pak Publishing Group
Journal DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar

Online ISSN: 2409-6490
Print ISSN: 2412-3382
Total Citation: 4

No.1

Effect of Whole Inedible Date and Amino Acid Supplementation on Growth Performance of Ross 308 Broiler Chicks


Pages: 9-18
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Effect of Whole Inedible Date and Amino Acid Supplementation on Growth Performance of Ross 308 Broiler Chicks

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.1/101.1.9.18


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Alaeldein M. Abudabos --- Mutassim M. Abdelrahman --- Gamaleldin M. Suliman --- Ahmed A. Al-Sagan
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Alaeldein M. Abudabos --- Mutassim M. Abdelrahman --- Gamaleldin M. Suliman --- Ahmed A. Al-Sagan (2015). Effect of Whole Inedible Date and Amino Acid Supplementation on Growth Performance of Ross 308 Broiler Chicks. Animal Review, 2(1): 9-18. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.1/101.1.9.18
This work aims to assess the potential of discarded date meal (DDM) as an alternative ingredient in broiler diets. The effect of substituting 5 or 10% of corn and soybean meal (SBM) with DDM on performance, carcass characteristics, serum constituents and nutrients retention of broilers from 12 to 35 d of age was evaluated. A total of 150 chicks were randomly distributed in a factorial arrangement (3x2) into six treatments. Three levels of DDM (0, 5 and 10%) and 2 levels of AAs (normal and high) were utilized. A significant interaction was detected for BWG (P<0.01) and FCR (P<0.001). Birds which had received 0% and 5% DDM and high AAs converted feed more efficiently when compared to those which had received low AAs.  When examining the main effects for FCR, both DDM and AAs showed a significant effects on FCR (P<0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Birds received 5% DDM converted feed more efficiently as compared to 0 and 10%. Also, birds received the high AAs level converted feed more efficiently as compared to the normal level. On the other hand, breast muscle yield and abdominal fat were affected by DDM and AAs (P<0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Birds on the 0% DDM had higher breast muscle yield as compared to 5 or 10% DDM. Also, high AAs increased breast yield by 1.5% as compared to normal AAs. The results revealed that birds received 5% DDM performed better than the control or 10%. Also, supplementing diets with higher AAs level improved the performance. Based on presented evidences, it is recommended to substitute 5% of corn and SBM with DDM.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature regarding the utilization of dates as a potential ingredient that could partially replace corn in broiler diets. This study documents that DDM could be incorporated in poultry diets as a cheap untraditional ingredient to reduce feeding cost. This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the effect of amino acids supplementation to DDM as a method to improve the nutritive value.
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Ingessana Goats Phenotype, Carcass and Wholesale Cuts Characteristics in Fadamia, Bao Locality, Blue Nile State, Sudan


Pages: 1-8
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Ingessana Goats Phenotype, Carcass and Wholesale Cuts Characteristics in Fadamia, Bao Locality, Blue Nile State, Sudan

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.1/101.1.1.8


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Mohmed E. Elimam --- Asma H.M.Hamed --- Amer A. Y. Abdalla
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Mohmed E. Elimam --- Asma H.M.Hamed --- Amer A. Y. Abdalla (2015). Ingessana Goats Phenotype, Carcass and Wholesale Cuts Characteristics in Fadamia, Bao Locality, Blue Nile State, Sudan. Animal Review, 2(1): 1-8. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.1/101.1.1.8
Two studies were conducted to characterize the phenotype, carcass and wholesale cuts in Ingessana goats in Fadamia, Bao Province, Blue Nile State, Sudan which is about 521km south east of Khartoum. In the first study 250 animals were used to study body weight and measurements and colours at different ages in villages in the area. In the second study 6 males at <1 and 1 year old (three in each age group) were used to study body components and carcass and wholesale characteristics. The data was statistically analyzed according to MSTAT. Body weight (BW) and measurements, except horns and tail length, were increased with age. The correlations between BW and measurements were calculated and different regression equations were used to predict BW from some body weight at different ages with no significant (P>0.05) differences between measured and predicted BW. Animals’ colours varied greatly and were mainly black and white (35%). All body components percentages, except skin and small intestines, were higher at <1 year old with no significant difference between the two age groups.  Slaughter weight, empty BW (EBW) and hot carcass weight were significantly (P <0.05) higher at1 year old. Dressing percentages were higher on EBW than LBW and were not significantly (P>0.05) different between the two age groups. Carcass muscle, bone, fat and muscle: fat were not significantly (P>0.05) different between the two age groups. Muscle: fat was significantly higher at 1 year old (P<0.05). There were no significant (P>0.05) differences in all wholesale cuts percentages between the two age groups. The percentages of leg and chump, single short forequarter and loin were higher at 1 year old and breast and neck percentages were higher at <1 year old.
Contribution/ Originality
The paper contributes the first logical analysis of phenotype, carcass and wholesale cuts characteristics of Ingessana goats in Blue Nile State, Sudan. The study also predicted equation for measuring body weight which contributes to the existing literature.
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