Asian Development Policy Review

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Print ISSN: 2518-2544
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No.2

Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur


Pages: 29-48
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Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.2/107.2.29.48


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Tasnim Khan --- Rana Ejaz Ali Khan --- Muhammad Ali Raza 
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Tasnim Khan --- Rana Ejaz Ali Khan --- Muhammad Ali Raza  (2015). Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur. Asian Development Policy Review, 3(2): 29-48. DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.2/107.2.29.48
 The literature confirmed the existence of gender discrimination in children?s health, nutrition and education in South Asia. This study examines, whether there are sex differences in stunting and wasting among schooling-going children (5-14 years) and how they are affected by socioeconomic factors. A sample of 684 school-going children of both sexes (376 male children and 308 female children) was selected randomly from different schools of both urban and rural areas of Bahawalpur. Weight and height were taken according to anthropometric measurements. The nutritional indices of World Health Organization (WHO) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) were used as nutritional standards. The stunting and wasting rates were found 10.1 and 15.2 percent for males and 15.2 and 25 percent for female children respectively. The binary logistic regression for two indices of malnutrition, i.e. wasting and stunting were run separately for male children and female children to determine gender discrimination in nutritional status of children. The probability of being stunted and wasted by increase in age was found significantly lower for females as compared to male children. The male and female children of nuclear households have higher probability to be stunted and wasted respectively but the effect has been found more severe for female children. Mother?s education emerged as one of the most important variables which decrease the probability of stunting for both male and female children. The effect is found more favorable for male as compared to female children. Household income status and living condition index has shown no significant effect on probability of malnutrition of male and female children.

Contribution/ Originality

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Educational Achievements of First and Subsequent Generation Learners in East Delhi/Ncr Region in India - A Comparative Study


Pages: 20-28
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Educational Achievements of First and Subsequent Generation Learners in East Delhi/Ncr Region in India - A Comparative Study

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.2/107.2.20.28


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Ashok Pandey --- Binod Kumar Singh 
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Ashok Pandey --- Binod Kumar Singh  (2015). Educational Achievements of First and Subsequent Generation Learners in East Delhi/Ncr Region in India - A Comparative Study. Asian Development Policy Review, 3(2): 20-28. DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.2/107.2.20.28
The present paper aims to find out the differences between study habits and the academic achievement of the rural and urban first generation learners and subsequent generation learners. For this study, 16 schools from East Delhi/ NCR have been selected based on the convenience sampling. From each school 20 students have been selected and out of which 10 are first generation learners and 10 are subsequent generation learners. The tool used in this paper was developed by Palsane and Sharma (1989) and named as Study Habit Inventory (SHI). The study found that there is a significant difference between study habits as well as the academic achievements of rural and urban first generation learners and subsequent generation learners. The result of this study has an implication for not only teachers, but also for students and parents.  The teachers in the classroom are confronted with the development of potentialities and academic ability of students, which is totally dependent upon teacher efficiency.

Contribution/ Originality
The present study has an implication for teachers, students and parents.  The teachers in the classroom are confronted with the development of potentialities and the academic ability of students, which is totally dependent upon teacher efficiency. The teacher must develop high self esteem among students and also develop an attitude, belief and values that they will be able to achieve high in their life.One of the findings of this paper shows that the first generation learners have poor study habits and subsequent generation learners have good study habits.  The first generation learners do not get any opportunity to learn from the elders in the family; hence they remain an unsupervised and unguided. The contribution of father’s educational background was more important than the intelligence of children to their academic achievement.  So care should be taken by the parents of the first generation learners in the regard to study time, study materials, student involvement, and physical conditions, etc.
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