Animal Review

Publish by: Pak Publishing Group
Journal DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar

Online ISSN: 2409-6490
Print ISSN: 2412-3382
Total Citation: 4

No.2

Suitability of Temperate and Tropical Crossbred Dairy Cattle under Peri-Urban Production System in Bangladesh


Pages: 26-36
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Suitability of Temperate and Tropical Crossbred Dairy Cattle under Peri-Urban Production System in Bangladesh

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NU Siddiquee --- M.A.Wadud --- MSA Bhuiyan --- AKMA Rahman --- M.R.Amin --- AKFH Bhuiyan
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NU Siddiquee --- M.A.Wadud --- MSA Bhuiyan --- AKMA Rahman --- M.R.Amin --- AKFH Bhuiyan (2014). Suitability of Temperate and Tropical Crossbred Dairy Cattle under Peri-Urban Production System in Bangladesh. Animal Review, 1(2): 26-36. DOI:
Suitability of temperate and tropical crossbred dairy cattle under peri-urban production system was investigated.The  study was conducted during a period from April, 2010 to March, 2013 in peri-urban dairy production system of Mymensingh district. The available dairy crossbred genotypes were 50% Holstein Friesian(HF)  , 62.5% HF (5/8HF), 75% HF (3/4HF).A total of 103 households, possessing 358 lactating cows were selected where two different management environments were applied:  (i) Intervention (E1) group and (ii) Non-intervention (E2) group. There were a total of 158 cows registered from 58 households in E1 and a total of 200 non-registered cows from 145 households in E2.  Average daily milk yield was 8.110.24 kg, it is higher in 62.5% HF genotype (8.600.41 kg) compared to 50% HF(8.320.42 kg) and 75% HF (7.420.42 kg). However, the intervention group (E1) was more efficient with an average of 9.85 0.39 than non intervention group (E2) with6.380.28 kg. The highest milk yield in 180 days was found (155074 kg) at 62.5 % HF and lowest (133976) at 75% HF genotype.  Against, GE interaction effects were not significant on total milk yield (TMY) and daily milk yield though effect of environment was highly significant (P<0.001). The shortest dry period was found in 50% (892.53 days) and highest in 75% HF cross cows (1022.72 days). The shortest age at first heat was found in 50 % (280.28) and highest in 75% (360.29) months. The shortest age at fist calving was found in 50% HF (370.30) and highest was in 75% HF (450.32) month. The shortest calving interval was found in 50% HF (3788.63) and highest was in 75% HF (43810.53) days. The shortest post-partum heat period found in 62.5% (913.31) days and highest in 75% HF (1093.72) days. The lowest number of services per conception found in 62.5% (1.420.07) and highest in75% (1.640.08) HF cross genotype. Conception rate was found shortest in 50% (712.66) and highest in 75% 802.52Holstein Friesian cross cows. In case of reproductive performances (number of services per conception, conception rate, age at first heat, age at first calving, dry period, calving interval), genotype,  environment  and  G x E  interaction had highly significant effects (P<0.001). Therefore, it can be concluded that for reproduction 50% HF crossbred cows and for production both 50% and 62.5% HF crossbred cows are suitable in small holder peri-urban dairying system.  
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature to inventive estimates of genotype by environment interactions to recommend appropriate crossbred cattle genotype to help Bangladeshi farmer for higher milk yield in the peri-urban area. This study uses new estimation of methodology to use  herd book keeping,  following breeding policy properly, Feeding management, Farmers training, proper recording system, etc .
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Effects of Age at Fattening On Butana Camel Males Carcass Characteristics in the Sudan


Pages: 17-25
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Effects of Age at Fattening On Butana Camel Males Carcass Characteristics in the Sudan

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Asma Himmed Mohammed Hamed --- Mohamed Elamin Elimam --- Solafa I.A.O.
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Asma Himmed Mohammed Hamed --- Mohamed Elamin Elimam --- Solafa I.A.O. (2014). Effects of Age at Fattening On Butana Camel Males Carcass Characteristics in the Sudan. Animal Review, 1(2): 17-25. DOI:
Twelve male Butana camels were bought from Gadarif livestock market at 2, 3 and 4 years old (four in each age group) and fattened for eight weeks in the Animal Production Research Station in Gadarif, Gadarif State, Sudan. They were weighed before the morning meal at the beginning of the experiment and then weekly. The animals were fed sorghum stover ad lib in two equal meals at 8.00 am and 4.00 pm Each animal was daily offered 2.0 kg concentrates. The animals were fed for two weeks as a preliminary period before fattening for eight weeks. At the end of the experiment the animals were fasted overnight, weighed and then slaughtered. Blood was collected and head, neck and legs were removed and weighed.  The animals were then skinned, eviscerated and body components were removed and weighed separately. The gastro intestinal tract was weighed full and empty. The hot carcass was weighed with the kidneys intact and then one carcass side was divided into 6 whole sale cuts and the cuts were then dissected into muscle, bone and fat. Data was statistically analyzed by analysis of variance for a completely randomized design using SPSS program. The means were compared using least significant difference (LSD). Slaughter weight, EBW and hot carcass weight increased with age at fattening and were significantly (P< 0.05) lighter at 2 years old. Dressing percentages on LBW and EBW increased with age at fattening and were higher on EBW. They were least at 2 years old and highest at 4 years old. There was significant difference between 2 and 4 years old and between 3 and 4 years old on EBW. All body components weight increased with age at fattening, except lungs, heart and spleen. Mean weights of blood, head, liver, stomach and intestines were significantly (P< 0.05) higher at 4 years than at 2 years old, but not significantly (P> 0.05) different between 3 and 4 years old. Hides, fore legs and hind legs weights were significantly (P< 0.05) heavier at 3 and 4 years old than at 2 years old. Lungs weight increased up to 3 years and then declined. All body components weight as percentage of EBW increased with age, except lungs, spleen, kidneys and heart and was not significantly different among age groups.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the effect of age at fattening on carcass characteristics of Camelus dromedarius. It contributes in the existing literature. The papers primary contribution is finding that slaughter weight, EBW and hot carcass weight increased with age at fattening in Camelus dromedarius.
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