Animal Review

Publish by: Pak Publishing Group
Journal DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar

Online ISSN: 2409-6490
Print ISSN: 2412-3382
Total Citation: 4

No.3

Chemical Analysis of Acacia Ehrenbergiana (Salam) Tree Fruits (Seed and Pods) As Dry Season Supplement For Livestock in Arid and Semi –Arid Lands of Sudan


Pages: 76-80
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Chemical Analysis of Acacia Ehrenbergiana (Salam) Tree Fruits (Seed and Pods) As Dry Season Supplement For Livestock in Arid and Semi –Arid Lands of Sudan

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.3/101.3.76.80


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Mohamed S .A Abdalla --- Izeldin A. Babiker --- Kamal F. Elkalifa
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Mohamed S .A Abdalla --- Izeldin A. Babiker --- Kamal F. Elkalifa (2015). Chemical Analysis of Acacia Ehrenbergiana (Salam) Tree Fruits (Seed and Pods) As Dry Season Supplement For Livestock in Arid and Semi –Arid Lands of Sudan. Animal Review, 2(3): 76-80. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.3/101.3.76.80
In developing countries farming and livestock keeping are the most dominant activities for the indigenous people, proper farming maintain good and adequate grazing for livestock and hence support livelihood in such countries. Therefore, local inhabitants largely depend on some tree species suitable for grazing purposes.  In the present study, the nutritional value for fruits of Acacia ehrenbergiana (Salam) (seeds and pods) at the lower Atbra river basin in north eastern part of Sudan was investigated. Field samples of fruits were collected, each sample kept separately in a small cloth kit. Chemical analysis of fruit samples was conducted to quantify the content of various nutritional attributes including: the crude protein, crude fibers, fats, starch, ash, and moisture content. In addition to some minerals namely P, Ca, Mg, Na, Cur and Fe. Chemical analysis revealed that CP is found to be as high as 30.99%, CF reached 25.11%, the starch content 12.12%, fat 4.1%, and ash content 11.81% .These values showed the high nutritional values fruits. Similarly mineral contents demonstrate good amounts of Na and Ca that needed by livestock for adequate growth, but lower amounts of P that should be supplemented to the diets. Most tested browse fruits revealed adequate nutritional values of Acacia ehrenbergiana (Salam) fruits as a protein or dry season supplement. Fodder trees still need to be fully evaluated in order to reduce the cost of feed . This can be done by being used as a feed supplement to livestock .Increasing the base for feed options (forages) with high quality feed will support the ever increasing demand for livestock products ,as feed is the most important factor influencing  livestock production in the harsh environment of the dry lands.
Contribution/ Originality

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Stover Yield and Chemical Composition in Some Sorghum Varieties in Gadarif State, Sudan


Pages: 68-75
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Stover Yield and Chemical Composition in Some Sorghum Varieties in Gadarif State, Sudan

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.3/101.3.68.75


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Asma H. M. Hamed --- Selma O. Abbas --- Khalafalla A. Ali --- Mohmed E. Elimam
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Asma H. M. Hamed --- Selma O. Abbas --- Khalafalla A. Ali --- Mohmed E. Elimam (2015). Stover Yield and Chemical Composition in Some Sorghum Varieties in Gadarif State, Sudan. Animal Review, 2(3): 68-75. DOI: 10.18488/journal.ar/2015.2.3/101.3.68.75
An experiment was conducted at the faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences farm, University of Gadarif, Gadarif State, Sudan to evaluate dry matter yield and nutritive value of the stover of four local sorghum varieties (Bashier, Zahratelgadambalia, Butana and Arfagadamac). Dry matter yield, morphological traits and chemical composition were determined. There were significant (P<0.05) differences in dry matter yield and other morphological traits among varieties. Zahratelgadambalia had the highest dry matter yield (2520 kg/fed) and was 100%, 31% and 19% higher than Bashier, Butana and Arfagadamac varieties, respectively. It also had the highest stem height, stem weight and least in stem thickness. Arfagadamac was next to Zahratelgadambalia in dry matter yield and had the highest stem thickness. Butana was less productive than Zahratelgadambalia and Arfagadamac, but not significantly. Bashier was inferior to all varieties in dry matter yield and had the highest leaf: stem. Dry matter yield had a highly significant positive correlation with plant height (0.999) and positive correlation with stem weight (0.553), number of leaves/ plant and leaves weight. There were significant variations in chemical composition among sorghum varieties. Acid detergent fibre (ADF) was 46.4- 70.0%, neutral detergent fibre (NDF) was 59.9 - 79.3% and lignin was 9.2-13.5%. Butana variety stover had the least NDF and ADF among the four varieties. This indicated it was better in chemical composition and expected to be better in nutritive value unless other factors were not involved like anti nutritional factors.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the nutritive value and dry matter yield of local sorghum varieties in Gadarif State, the most important region for sorghum production in Sudan. It contributes to the existing literature in the analysis of correlation between morphological traits and dry matter yield.
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