Asian Development Policy Review

Publish by: Production and Hosting by Pak Publishing Group on behalf of Asian Economic and Social Society 

Online ISSN: 2313-8343
Print ISSN: 2518-2544
Total Citation: 0

Most Cited Articles

Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria


Pages: 20-38
Find References

Finding References


Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite
DOI:


Citation: 0
Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Wumi Olayiwola --- Henry Okodua --- Evans S. Osabuohien
Abstract
|
Reference
|
XML
|
PubMed
|
Video
Statstics
PDF Download Open Access
Wumi Olayiwola --- Henry Okodua --- Evans S. Osabuohien (2014). Finance For Growth and Policy Options for Emerging and Developing Economies: The Case of Nigeria. Asian Development Policy Review, 2(2): 20-38. DOI:
Finance is generally regarded as important for economic growth, but the role of finance in economic growth is a controversial issue in the economic literature. The concept of ?finance for growth? refocuses the relationship between finance and economic growth by redirecting the role of government policies in finance, and recognizes how finance without frontiers is changing what government policies can do and achieve. The focus of this paper is not to join the debate, nor to analyse the impact of financial development on economic growth, but to discuss the concept of ?finance for growth? within the context of emerging and developing economies. The increasing development needs of Emerging Market Economies (EMEs) to raise per capita income, reduce unemployment rate, construct and maintain basic infrastructure, and invest more in human capital, make the role of finance for growth in these economies indispensable. The paper reviews the financial policies in selected EMEs including: China, South Africa and Nigeria and attempts to situate the Nigerian economy among the EMEs within the context of Finance for Growth. The paper notes that financial policies designed in various EMEs had the similar goal of making the financial system to provide key financial functions. However, large differences exist in the efficiency of the financial system in each country. The paper found that what matters to economic growth is access to financial services or financial inclusion and not which sector supplies the funds. The paper suggests appropriate policy options to build confidence in the Nigerian financial system.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which have investigated the concept of ―finance for growth‖ in EMEs. It approaches the problem by assessing the performance of financial policies of selected EMEs in mobilizing financial resources for economic growth, and identifying policy options necessary for achieving finance for growth.
  1. Aizenman, J., B. Pinto and A. Radziwill, 2007. Sources for financing domestic capital—is foreign saving a viable option for developing countries? Journal of International Money and Finance, 26(5): 682–702.
  2. Aryeetey, E., 2009. The global financial crisis and domestic resource mobilization in Africa. Mimeo, ISSER.
  3. Baliamoune, M. and R. Chowdhury, 2003. The long-run behavior and short-run dynamics of private savings in Morocco. Savings and Development, 27(2): 135-160.
  4. Caprio, G. and P. Honohan, 2001. Finance for growth: Policy choices in a volatile World' MPRA Paper No. 9929.
  5. Central Bank of Nigeria-CBN (Various Issues), 2009. Annual reports and financial statements. Abuja: CBN.
  6. Culpeper, R., 2008. Enhancing domestic resource mobilization. G-24 Policy Brief ,No. 25.
  7. Development Policy Centre-DPC, 1998. Economic Intelligence, No. 7.
  8. FIRS-Federal Inland Revenue Services, 2008. Current tax policy reforms. Available from http://www.firs.gov.ng/about_us/mission_and_mandate/index.html#4 [Accessed 5/5/08].
  9. Fosu, A.K., 2008. Democracy and growth in Africa: Implications of increasing electoral competitiveness. Economics Letters, 100(3): 442–444.
  10. Henri-Bernard, S.L., 2010. Taxation for development in Africa: A shared responsibility. Trade Negotiations Insights, 9(6): 3-4.
  11. International Monetary Fund-IMF, 2008. South Africa: Financial stability assessment. Publication Services Washington DC.
  12. Lucas, R.E., 1988. On the mechanics of economic development. Journal of Monetary Economics, 22(1): 3-42.
  13. Obstfeld, M., 2008. International finance and growth in developing countries: What have we learned? Commission on growth and Development Working Paper No. 34, World Bank.
  14. Olayiwola, K. and H. Okodua, 2013. Foreign direct investment, non-oil export and economic growth in Nigeria. A causality analysis. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 3(11): 1479-1496.
  15. Olayiwola, K.W. and E.S.C. Osabuohien, 2010. Evaluation of the role of fiscal policy in promoting savings, investment and capital formation in Nigeria. The Journal of Banking and Finance, 10(1): 26-45.
  16. Olayiwola, W.K., 2010. Practice and standard of corporate governance in the Nigerian Banking Industry. International Journal of Economics and Finance, 2(4): 178-189.
  17. Prasad, E., R.G. Rajan and A. Subramanian, 2007. Foreign capital and economic growth. Brookings papers on economic activity. Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, 38(2007-1): 153–230.
  18. Quartey, P., 2005. Financial sector development, savings mobilization and poverty reduction in Ghana. UNU-WIDER Research Paper No. 2005/71.
  19. Shirai, S., 2002. Banking sector reform in India and China: Does India experience offer lessons for China future reform agenda. JBICJ Discussion Paper Series, Discussion Paper No. 2.

National Housing Policies and the Realisation of Improved Housing for All in Nigeria: An Alternative Approach


Pages: 47-60
Find References

Finding References


National Housing Policies and the Realisation of Improved Housing for All in Nigeria: An Alternative Approach

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite
DOI:


Citation: 0
Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Kalu, Ijeoma E. --- Agbarakwe, Henry Ugochukwu --- Anowor, Oluchukwu F. 
Abstract
|
Reference
|
XML
|
PubMed
|
Video
Statstics
PDF Download Open Access
Kalu, Ijeoma E. --- Agbarakwe, Henry Ugochukwu --- Anowor, Oluchukwu F.  (2014). National Housing Policies and the Realisation of Improved Housing for All in Nigeria: An Alternative Approach. Asian Development Policy Review, 2(3): 47-60. DOI:
The seventh goal of the MDGs is to ensure environmental sustainability which includes as its targets: increasing access to new technologies to support sustainable development by making information about sustainable practices more widespread, and bringing new technologies to rural areas such that people will be able to have better access to information and employment without having to migrate to urban areas; these would without doubt help to system the flow of rural-urban migration and as well stem the growth of slums. Good quality housing as a basic need is lacking for a sizeable number of people around the globe but seem most severe in developing economies including Nigeria. Also few houses are available, especially in the urban centers, to the ever increasing number of workers in both formal and informal sectors. The debates on the direction of housing and welfare policy have often been guided by assumptions derived from a preponderance of Anglo-American cases and perspectives. The purpose of this study is to present an alternative approach to housing policies especially in Nigeria; and we have come to the inescapable conclusion that housing is a social responsibility which cannot be left to the free play of market forces. This study therefore recommends the need to strengthen institutions and overhaul systems and processes for a more virile housing sector such that a balance between the urban housing units and the rural housing units could be attained.

Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature and offers alternative view to the dominant approach to housing issues as it deviates significantly from the preponderance pro-market perspectives. It proffers a holistic approach to contain housing challenges.
  1. Ademiluyi, A.I. and B.A. Raji, 2008. Public and private developers as agents in urban housing delivery in Sub- Saharan Africa: The situation in Lagos State. Humanity & Social Sciences Journal, 3(2): 143-150.
  2. Agiobenebo, T.J., 2003. Public sector economics: Theories, issues and application. Lima Computers, Port Harcourt.
  3. Akeju, A.A., 2007. Challenges to providing affordable housing in Nigeria. Abuja: Shehu Yar'adua Center.
  4. Akinmoladun, O.I. and J. Oluwoye, 2007. An assessment of why the problems of housing shortages persist in developing countries: A case of study of Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Pakistan Journal of Social Science, 4(4): 589-598.
  5. Anyanwu, J.C., 1997. The structure of the Nigerian economy (1960 - 1997). Onitsha: Joanee Educational Publishers Ltd.
  6. Apparicio, P. and A. Seguin, 2006. Measuring the accessibility of services and facilities for residents of public housing in montreal. Urban Studies, 43(1): 187-211.
  7. Arimah, B.C., 2000. Housing sector performance in global perspective a cross-city investigation. Urban Studies, 37(3): 2553-2579.
  8. Burns Leland, S. and L. Grebler, 1976. Resource allocation to housing investment: A comparative international study. Economic Development and Cultural Change, 25(1): 271-282.
  9. Chatterjee, L., 1981. Housing development in Nigeria occasional paper series, Agency for International Development Office of Housing, Boston. Available from http://humanitarianlibrary.org/sites/default/files/2013/08/PNAAK030.pdf.
  10. Chukwujekwu, I.E., 2006. Facilitating low cost housing scheme: Which way forward in housing today. Journal of the Association of Housing Corporation of  Nigeria (AHCN) ISSN ), 1(10): 0331-9598.
  11. Doling, J. and R. Ronald, 2010. Home ownership and asset-based welfare. J Hous and the Built Environ, 25(2): 165-173.
  12. Fernandez-Maldonado, A.M. and J. Bredenoord, 2010. Progressive housing approaches in the current peruvian policies. Habitat International, 32(1): 11- 18. DOI 10.1016/j.habitatint.2009.11.018.
  13. Filani, M.O., 1987. Accessibility and urban poverty in Nigeria: The urban poor in Nigeria. Ibadan: Evans Brothers (Nigeria) Publishers Ltd.
  14. Hanson, G., R. Lloyd and B. Lorimer, 2004. Evaluation of the social housing programme. Yukon: Yukon Housing Corporation.
  15. Ibem, E.O. and O.O. Amole, 2010. Evaluation of public housing programmes in Nigeria: A theoretical and conceptual approach. The Built & Human Environment Review, 1(3): 88 - 117.
  16. Jhingan, M.L., 2007. The economics of development and planning. 33rd Edn., Delhi: Vrinda Publications (P) Ltd.
  17. Keynes, J.M., 1936. The general theory of employment, interest, and money. New York: Harcourt Brace.
  18. Lall, S., 2002. An evaluation of a public sector Low-Income housing project in Alwar, India. Working Paper No. 6 at Society for Development Studies in New Delhi-India Prepared for the DFID. Available from http://practicalaction.org/docs/shelter/uhd_wp6_evaluation_on19thMay,2009.
  19. Mabogunje, A., 2006. In housing today (2006). Taming the monster of housing affordability. Journal of the Association of Housing Corporation of Nigeria (AHCN) ISSN ) 0331-9598, 1(10).
  20. Magutu, J., 1997. An appraisal of chaani low-income housing programme in Kenya. Environment and Urbanization, 9(2): 307-320.
  21. Marcano, L. and I.J. Ruprah, 2008. Incapacity to pay or moral hazard? Public mortgage rates delinquency in Chile, OVE Working Papers No. 0308. Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
  22. Mayo Stephen, K., 1981. Theory and estimation in the economics of housing demand. Journal of Urban Economics, 10(1): 95-116.
  23. McMaster, R. and C. Watkins, 1999. The economics of housing: The need for a new approach. Paper Presented at PRRES/AsRES/IRES Conference, 26-30 January 1999, Kuala Lumpur.
  24. Meen, G., 1998. 25 years of house price modelling in the UK. What have we learnt and where do we go from here? Paper Presented at the ENHR Conference, Cardiff.
  25. Mohit, M.A., M. Ibrahim and Y.R. Rashid, 2010. Assessment of residential satisfaction in newly designed public low-cost housing in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Habitat International, 34(2): 18-27.
  26. Mukhija, V., 2004. The contradictions in enabling private developer of affordable housing: A cautionary case from India. Urban Studies, 4(11): 2231-2244.
  27. Obashoro-John, O., 2002. Programme evaluation in Nigeria: Challenges and prospects. Lagos: Department of Adult Education University of Lagos.
  28. Obeng-Odoom, F., 2009. Has the habitat for humanity housing scheme achieved its goal? A Ghanaian case study. Journal Housing and the Built Environment, 24(1): 67-84.
  29. Ohale, L. and H.U. Agbarakwe, 2009. An introduction to economic planning. Port Harcourt: Emhai Books.
  30. Okowa, W.J., 2006. Urban bias in Nigerian development: A study of the matthew effect in national development. Port Harcourt: Pam Unique Publishing Company Limited.
  31. Okupe, O., 2002. Problem of real estate developers in Nigeria, A Paper Presented at a Workshop Organized by the Nigerian Institute of Quantity Surveyors, Abuja.
  32. Sengupta, U. and S. Sharma, 2008. No longer sukumbasis: Challenges in grassroots –led squatter resettlement programme in kathmandu with special reference to Kirtipur housing project. Habitat International, 33(1): 34-44.
  33. Sengupta, U. and A.G. Tipple, 2007. The performance of public –sector housing in Kolkata, India in the post–reform milieu. Urban Studies, 44(10): 2009-2027.
  34. Ubale, M.Y., D. Martin and S.T. Wee, 2013. Comparative study between Malaysia and Nigeria formal low cost housing policy issues. Asian Economic and Financial Review, 3(7): 923-947.
  35. Yeun, B., A. Yeh, J.A. Stephen, G. Earl, J. Ting and L.K. Kwee, 2006. High-rise living Singapore public housing. Urban Studies, 42(3): 583-600.
  36. Yinger, J., 2005. Housing and commuting: The theory of urban residential structure. An e-Book, Version, 1.0: April 2005.

An Empirical Study of the Impact of Metro Station Proximity on Property Value in The Case of Nanjing, China


Pages: 61-71
Find References

Finding References


An Empirical Study of the Impact of Metro Station Proximity on Property Value in The Case of Nanjing, China

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite
DOI:


Citation: 0
Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Xinyue Zhang --- Yanqing Jiang 
Abstract
|
Reference
|
XML
|
PubMed
|
Video
Statstics
PDF Download Open Access
Xinyue Zhang --- Yanqing Jiang  (2014). An Empirical Study of the Impact of Metro Station Proximity on Property Value in The Case of Nanjing, China. Asian Development Policy Review, 2(4): 61-71. DOI:
This paper analyzes the impact of metro station proximity on property value from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. Data on second-hand apartments within six kilometers of metro line 1 and 2 stations in Nanjing are used. Our empirical results show that metro station proximity has a positive partial effect on property value. The degree of impact diminishes with the increase of the distance. The extent of impact reaches the largest when the distance is less than five hundred meters, and is still remarkable when the distance is within two kilometers. The effect becomes insignificant when the distance is larger than two kilometers. Our empirical results also show that with the distance increasing, the extent of price variation is widened first, reaching a peak when the property is within one kilometer, and then decreases. In addition, metro station proximity in suburban areas is shown to have a higher positive impact on property value compared with metro station proximity in urban areas.

Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature by analyzing the impact of metro station proximity on property value from both theoretical and empirical perspectives, in the case of the city Nanjing, China.
  1. Alonso, W., 1964. Location and land use: Toward a general theory of land rent. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  2. Bowes David, R. and R. Ihlanfeldt Keith, 2001. Identifying the impacts of rail transit stations on residential property values. Journal of Urban Economics, 50(1): 1-25.
  3. Brigham, E., 1965. The determinants of residential land values. Land Economics, 41(4): 325-334.
  4. Fujita, M., 1989. Urban economic theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  5. Grass, R.G., 1992. The estimation of residential property values around transit station sites in Washington, D.C. Journal of Economics and Finance, 16(3): 139-146.
  6. Hansen, W.G., 1959. How accessibility shapes land use. Journal of American Institute of Planners, 25(2): 73-76.
  7. Kruk, R.V.D., 2001. Economic impact of wetland amenities: A special econometric analysis of the Dutch housing market. Unpublished Manuscript.
  8. Von Thu?nen, J., 1830. Der isolierte staat in Beziehung auf landwirschaft und nationalokonomie. Munich: Pflaum.

System of Payroll in the Public Sector Administration


Pages: 9-19
Find References

Finding References


System of Payroll in the Public Sector Administration

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite
DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.1/107.1.9.19


Citation: 0
Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Musa Success Jibrin --- Success Blessing Ejura --- Nwaorgu Innocent Augustine 
Abstract
|
Reference
|
XML
|
PubMed
|
Video
Statstics
PDF Download Open Access
Musa Success Jibrin --- Success Blessing Ejura --- Nwaorgu Innocent Augustine  (2015). System of Payroll in the Public Sector Administration. Asian Development Policy Review, 3(1): 9-19. DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.1/107.1.9.19
Salary payments in the public sector administration are a key to service success, performance effectiveness and efficiency. Be that as it may, this write up was painstakingly tailored to lay much emphasis on the importance of labour and wages in the public sector management. Pay roll system in the public sector administration lays emphasis on productivity and prompts remunerations. In going about these various payroll preparation methods purported efforts were made to demonstrate how far adoptable the system are in bringing about effective and efficient salaries and wages administration in the public sector. Various outstanding remuneration literatures were reviewed and far reaching observations were advanced to do justice to the subject matter. However, a lot still beckons salaries wages scholars to lend their voices for the larger benefit of man.

Contribution/ Originality

  1. Armstrong, M., 2000. Feel the width (Broadbanding). People Management, CIPD: London, 6(3): 34-38.
  2. Armstrong, M. and H. Murlis, 2005. Reward management – a handbook of remuneration strategy and practice. 5th Edn., London: Kogan Page.
  3. Armstrong, M. and T. Stephens, 2005. A handbook of employee reward management and practice. Kogan Page: London Armstrong M, and Brown D, (2001) New Dimensions in Pay Management, CIPD: London.
  4. Dangana, E.A. and I.S. Dongs, 2011. Managing people in the public sector for effective service delivery, journal of public administration. Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria: Kogi State University.
  5. Guest, D. and N. Conway, 2000. The psychological contract in the public service: Results of the 2000 CIPD survey of employee relationships. London: CIPD.
  6. Gunnigle, P., N. Heraty and M. Morley, 2006. Human resource management in Ireland. 3rd Edn., Dublin: Gill and Macmillan.

Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur


Pages: 29-48
Find References

Finding References


Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite
DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.2/107.2.29.48


Citation: 0
Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Tasnim Khan --- Rana Ejaz Ali Khan --- Muhammad Ali Raza 
Abstract
|
Reference
|
XML
|
PubMed
|
Video
Statstics
PDF Download Open Access
Tasnim Khan --- Rana Ejaz Ali Khan --- Muhammad Ali Raza  (2015). Gender Analysis of Malnutrition: A Case Study of School-Going Children in Bahawalpur. Asian Development Policy Review, 3(2): 29-48. DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.2/107.2.29.48
 The literature confirmed the existence of gender discrimination in children?s health, nutrition and education in South Asia. This study examines, whether there are sex differences in stunting and wasting among schooling-going children (5-14 years) and how they are affected by socioeconomic factors. A sample of 684 school-going children of both sexes (376 male children and 308 female children) was selected randomly from different schools of both urban and rural areas of Bahawalpur. Weight and height were taken according to anthropometric measurements. The nutritional indices of World Health Organization (WHO) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) were used as nutritional standards. The stunting and wasting rates were found 10.1 and 15.2 percent for males and 15.2 and 25 percent for female children respectively. The binary logistic regression for two indices of malnutrition, i.e. wasting and stunting were run separately for male children and female children to determine gender discrimination in nutritional status of children. The probability of being stunted and wasted by increase in age was found significantly lower for females as compared to male children. The male and female children of nuclear households have higher probability to be stunted and wasted respectively but the effect has been found more severe for female children. Mother?s education emerged as one of the most important variables which decrease the probability of stunting for both male and female children. The effect is found more favorable for male as compared to female children. Household income status and living condition index has shown no significant effect on probability of malnutrition of male and female children.

Contribution/ Originality

  1. Alderman, H. and P. Gartler, 1997. Family resources and gender differences in human capital investment: The demand for children’s medical-care in Pakistan. In Haddad, L., J. Hoddinott and H. Alderman (Eds). International resource allocation in developing countries: Models, methods and policy. Baltimore: John Hopkin Univeristy Press.
  2. Arnold, F., M.K. Choe and T.K. Roy, 1998. Son preference, the family-building process and child mortality in India. Population Studies, 52(3): 301-315.
  3. Arnold, F., S. Kishor and T.K. Roy, 2002. Sex-selective abortions in India. Population and Development Review, 28(4): 1-28.
  4. Aturupane, H., A.B. Deolalikar and D. Gunewardena, 2008. The determinants of child weight and height in Sri Lanka: A qualitative regression approach. Research Paper No. 2008/53. UNU-WIDER.
  5. Basu, A.M., 1993. How pervasive are sex differentials in childhood nutritional levels in South Asia?. Social Biology, 40(1-2): 25-37.
  6. Biswas, S.C., M.A. Darda and M.F. Aslam, 2001. Factors affecting childhood immunization in Bangladesh. Pakistan Development Review, 40(1): 57-70.
  7. Bourne, P.A., 2009. Childhood health in Jamaica: Changing patterns in health conditions of children 0-14 years. North American Journal of Medical Science, 1(4): 160-168.
  8. Chen, L.A.K., M.A. Chowdhury and S.L. Huffman, 1980. Anthropometric assessment of energy-protein malnutrition and subsequent risk of mortality among pre-school aged children. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 33(8): 1836-1845.
  9. Choudhury, K.K., M.A. Hanifi, S. Rasheed and A. Bhuiya, 2000. Gender inequality and severe malnutrition among children in a remote rural area of Bangladesh. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 18(3): 123-130.
  10. Christiansen, L. and H. Alderman, 2004. Child malnutrition in Ethiopia: Can maternal knowledge augment the role of income? Economic Development and Cultural Change, 52(2): 278-312.
  11. DasGupta, M., 1987. Selective discrimination against female children in rural Punjab, India. Population and Development Review, 13(1): 77-100.
  12. Garcia, M. and H. Alderman, 1989. Patterns and determinants of malnutrition in children in Pakistan: Impact of community health. Pakistan Development Review, 28(4): 891-902.
  13. Giroux, S.C., 2008. Child stunting across schooling and fertility transitions: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa. Calverton, Maryland, USA: MACRO International.
  14. Haddad, L., C. Pena, C. Nishida, A. Quisumging and A. Slack, 1996. Food security and nutrition implications of intrahousehold bias: A review of literature. FCND Discussion Paper No.9. Washington, D.C: International Food Policy Research Institute.
  15. Hien, N.N. and N.N. Hoa, 2009. Nutritional status and determinants of malnutrition in children under three years of age in Nghean, Vietnam. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 8(7): 958-964.
  16. Holmes, J., 2006. Do community factors have a differential impact on the health outcomes of boys and girls? Evidence from rural Pakistan. Health Policy Plan, 21(3): 231-240.
  17. Khan, R.E.A., 2005. Gender discrimination in demand for child schooling. GCU Economics Journal, 37(1&2): 29-58.
  18. Khan, R.E.A., 2005;2008. Gender discrimination in demand for child schooling. GCU Economics Journal, 37(1&2): 29-58.
  19. Khan, R.E.A., 2008. Gender analysis of children activities in Pakistan. Pakistan Development Review, 47(2): 169-195.
  20. Khan, R.E.A. and T. Azid, 2011. Malnutrition in primary school-age children: A case of urban and slum areas of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. International Journal of Social Economics, 38(9): 748-766.
  21. Khan, R.E.A. and T. Khan, 2004. Economics of malnutrition in children. Journal of Educational Research, 7(1,2): 26-39.
  22. King, E. and A. Mason, 2001. Engendering development through gender equality in rights, resources and voice. World Bank Policy Research Report. World Bank, Washington, D.C.
  23. Kostermans, K., 1993. Assessing the quality of anthropometric data. Living standard measurement study No.101. Washington, D.C: World Bank.
  24. Marcoux, A., 2002. Sex differentials in undernutrition: A look at survey evidence. Population and Development Review, 28(2): 275-284.
  25. Mason, K.O., 1994. Conceptualizing and measuring women’s status. Paper Presented at Annual Meeting of the Population. Association of America, May 5-7.
  26. Mbuya, M.N.N., M. Chidem, B. Chasekwa and V. Mishra, 2010. Biological, social, and environmental determinants of low birth-weight and stunting among infants and young children in Zimbabwe. Calverton, Maryland, USA: Zimbabwe Working Papers.
  27. Mehrotra, S., 2006. Child malnutrition and gender discrimination in South Asia. Economic and Political Weekly, 61(10): 912-918.
  28. Mian, R.M.A., M. Ali, P.A. Ferroni and P. Underwood, 2002. The nutritional status of school-aged children in an urban squatter settlement in Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 1(3): 121-123.
  29. Mishra, V., S. Lahiri and N.Y. Luther, 1999. Child nutrition in India. National family health survey subject reports No. 14. Mumbai: International Institute for Population Sciences; and Honolulu: East-West Center Program on Population.
  30. Mishra, V., T.K. Roy and R.D. Retherford, 2004. Sex differential in childhood feeding, health-care and nutritional status in India. East-West Center Working Papers. Population and Health Series, Paper No.113. East-West Center, Hawaii.
  31. Mondal, P.R., S. Biswas and K. Bose, 2012. Gender discrimination in undernutrition with mediating factors among bengalee school children from Eastern India. HOMO Journal of Comparative Human Biology, 63(2): 126-135.
  32. Mosley, W.H., 1985. Biological and socioeconomic determinants of child survival. A Proximate Determinants Framework Integrating Fertility and Mortality Variables. In International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP). International Population Conference, Florence. Paris: IUSSP,  2:190-208.
  33. Mosley, W.H. and L.C. Chen, 1984. An analytical framework for the study of child survival in developing countries. Population and Development Review, 10(1): 25-45.
  34. Mozumder, A.B., K. Barket-E, T.T. Kane, A. Levin and S. Ahmed, 2000. The effect of birth interval on malnutrition in Bangladesh: Infants and young children. Journal of Biosocial Sciences, 32(4): 289-300.
  35. Muhuri, P.K. and S.H. Preston, 1991. Effects of family composition on mortality differentials by sex among children in matlab Bangladesh. Population and Development Review, 17(3): 415-434.
  36. Mukherjee, R.M., L.C.S. Chaturveedi and C.R. Bhalwar, 2008. Determinants of nutritional status of school children. Malnutrition Military Journal of Armed Forces, India, 4(3): 227-231.
  37. Mukuria, A., J. Cushing and J. Sangha, 2005. Nutritional status of children: Results from the demographic and health surveys 1994-2001. Calverton, Maryland, USA: ORC Macro.
  38. Pande, R.P., 2003. Selective gender differences in childhood nutrition and immunization in rural India: The role of siblings. Demography, 40(3): 595-418.
  39. Ravindaran, T.K.S. and U.S. Mishra, 2000. Health consequences of gender-based discrimination in childhood: A review of recent evidence. Paper Presented at the WHO Meeting on Gender Analysis for Health, Geneva, 28-30, June.
  40. Sahn, D.E. and S.D. Younger, 2005. Improvements in children’s health: Does inequality matter. Journal of Economic Inequality, 3(2): 125-143.
  41. Ukwuani, F.A. and C.M. Suchindran, 2003. Implications of women’s work for child nutritional status in Sub-Saharan Africa: A case study of Nigeria. Social Science & Medicine, 56(10): 2109-2121.
  42. UNDP, 2000. Human development report 2000: Human rights and human development. Published for United Nations development program. New York: Oxford University Press.
  43. Visaria, L. and P. Visaria, 1995. India’s population in ttransition. Population Bulletin, 50(3): 1-51.
  44. Wamani, H., T. Tylleskar, A.N. Astrom, J.K. Tumwine and S. Peterson, 2004. Mothers’ education but not fathers education, household assets or land ownership is the best predictor of child health inequalities in rural Uganda. International Journal for Equity in Health, 3(1): 9.
  45. World Bank, 2002. Pakistan poverty assessment. Poverty in Pakistan: Vulnerability, social gaps and rural dynamics. Report No. 2429. PAK. The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
  46. World Bank, 2005. Pakistan country gender assessment report: Bridging the gap, opportunities and challenges. Report No. 32244-PAK. Environment and Social Development Sector Unit. South Asia Region. World Bank, Washington, D.C.

The Representability of City Councils in Turkey: The Case of Kahramanmaras Province


Pages: 61-75
Find References

Finding References


The Representability of City Councils in Turkey: The Case of Kahramanmaras Province

Search :
Google Scholor
Search :
Microsoft Academic Search
Cite
DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.3/107.3.61.75


Citation: 0
Export to    BibTeX   |   EndNote   |   RIS

Ugur YILDIRIM --- Zehra GUL --- Soner AKIN --- Celalettin SEN --- Murtaza ERSOZ 
Abstract
|
Reference
|
XML
|
PubMed
|
Video
Statstics
PDF Download Open Access
Ugur YILDIRIM --- Zehra GUL --- Soner AKIN --- Celalettin SEN --- Murtaza ERSOZ  (2015). The Representability of City Councils in Turkey: The Case of Kahramanmaras Province. Asian Development Policy Review, 3(3): 61-75. DOI: 10.18488/journal.107/2015.3.3/107.3.61.75
The role of local governments has recently increased in importance, and as reforms and restructuring of their functions have revealed, the concept of ?representation and participation? is coming into prominence.? Notably, the representation of local communities within the decisions is mainly taken on behalf of society gained importance. The city councils, which are under the focal scope of our study, are the ones constituted by "local representatives" being elected by local communities and responsible for protecting the rights of society. The acknowledgement of representatives by society, the representatives? own recognition of society and also representing issue emerged as important determinants so that the function of representation might materialize as effective. This study examined the represent ability of city council members in Turkey within the case of Kahramanmaraş Province in Turkey. Hence, the profile of all city council members was presented, and then the views and approaches of them were discussed. The elicited approaches and views which belong to the members were mainly probed within the frame of "represent ability of city council members".

Contribution/ Originality
This study is unique and original on paying attention for demographic features’ own effects through the representation facilities and organs’ using. Indeed, instead of a more theoretical scanning framework, a unique study on researching the available position of a city on local representation was performed.
  1. Aksu, H. and H. Kurtulus, 2011. Yerel Temsil ve Katilim Açisindan Sivas Belediye Meclisi. Türk Idare Dergisi, 8(15): 113-132.
  2. Çitçi, O., 1996. Temsil, Kat?lma ve Yerel Demokrasi. Ça?da? Yerel Yönetimler Dergisi, 5(6): 5-14.
  3. Oktay, T., 2013a. Yerel Siyaset Ba?lam?nda Belediye Meclis Komisyonlar. ?stanbul: MBB Yay?n?, s.26.
  4. Örs, B., 2006. Siyasal temsil. ?stanbul: ?stanbul Üniversitesi Siyasal Bilgiler Fakültesi Dergisi.
  5. Toplak, J., 2003. Preferential vote and its use in Slovenia. Lex Localis, 1(2): 15-43.
  6. TÜ?K, 2014. TÜ?K Türkiye ?statistik Kurumu. Available from http://www.tuik.gov.tr [Accessed 12.03.2014].
  7. TÜ?K, 2015. TÜ?K Türkiye ?statistik Kurumu. Available from http://www.tuik.gov.tr/ilGostergeleri/iller/K.MARAS.pdf [Accessed 15.01.2015].
  8. Yildirim, S., 1993. Yerel Yönetim ve Demokrasi: Kavramlar. ?stanbul: Yakla??mlar.

ADVERTISEMENT