International Journal of English Language and Literature Studies

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Asian Economic and Social Society 
CiteScore: 0.46 - h5 - index : 2 (Google Scholar)
Online ISSN: 2306-0646
Print ISSN: 2306-9910
Total Citation: 60

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Marlows Dilemma and Ours; Conrad and Africas Development Agenda: A Reading of Heart of Darkness

Pages: 1-10
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Marlows Dilemma and Ours; Conrad and Africas Development Agenda: A Reading of Heart of Darkness

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.23/2017.6.1/23.1.1.10

Elizabeth T. AyukAko

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  1. Achebe, C., 2000. An image of Africa. In Richter, H David. Falling into theory: Conflicting views on rereading literature. Boston: Bedford. pp: 323-333.
  2. Maurice, H., 1961. A brief history and appraisal. London: Pall Mall Press. pp: 13.
(2017). Marlows Dilemma and Ours; Conrad and Africas Development Agenda: A Reading of Heart of Darkness. International Journal of English Language and Literature Studies, 6(1): 1-10. DOI: 10.18488/journal.23/2017.6.1/23.1.1.10
Consciously or unconsciously Heart of Darkness is a statement on the (our) difficulty of negotiating development and moral sanity. Marlow?s quest to understand Kurtz?s ventures and remedy him lead rather to the blank realization that the man torn apart by violent verbiage is himself a victim of the quest for development in an environment that seemingly needed domestication. More than a hundred years after its publication, the ripple effect of Heart of Darkness are insistent, the more so because its producer?s virile imagination finds adequate space in our modern political andeconomic consciousness. In spite of the numerous criticisms levelled against Kurtz, he remains the quintessence of a legitimate capitalist search for self-aggrandizement. In this regard, the paper questions and investigates the impact of the exploitation of Africa?s natural resources on the physical and social environment. Additionally, it attempts to understand the extent to which this may exacerbate our moral outrage. In the light of this, the paper locates Kurtz?s, Marlow?s and the reader?s anguish in their difficulty to resolve both the cultural and economical moral stigmas that come with progress. Therefore, this paper argues that Kurtz, Marlow and the reader are all drawn into a moral battle with themselves because of their inability to reconcile the necessity for development and the urgency of preserving the physical and moral environment that makes this possible.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes in the existing literature on Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and especially on the symbolic relevance of Kurtz and Marlow and the readers.

The Use of Metacognitive Strategies by ESL Tertiary Learners in Learning IELTS Listening Course

Pages: 11-24
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The Use of Metacognitive Strategies by ESL Tertiary Learners in Learning IELTS Listening Course

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.23.2017.61.11.24

Daljeet Singh Sedhu , Suraini Mohd Ali , Haliza Harun

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(2017). The Use of Metacognitive Strategies by ESL Tertiary Learners in Learning IELTS Listening Course. International Journal of English Language and Literature Studies, 6(1): 11-24. DOI: 10.18488/journal.23.2017.61.11.24
Listening, in general, is a challenging language skill for many learners in which they usually face frustration (Arnold, 2000; Goh, 2000). The emphasis of this study is to identify the experiences of ESL learners when learning the listening skill for IELTS while applying metacognitive strategies in learning. The research instrument used in the present study is the semi-structured interviews with the aim of gaining foundational understanding from the selected respondents regarding their use of metacognitive strategies in learning the listening skills for the IELTS examination. The qualitative results of this study were based on interviews conducted among 10 participants who are undergraduate students, underwent an intervention programme which was designed for them to acquire the listening skills using the metacognitive strategies. The semi-structured interviews were recorded and transcribed for analysis by using the coding method. Findings of this study suggest that metacognitive strategies presents a viable solution for acquiring appropriate skills in the listening component because although most individuals of normal intelligence engage in metacognitive regulation when confronted with an effortful cognitive task, some are more metacognitive than others. Those with greater metacognitive abilities tend to be more successful in their cognitive endeavours. Additionally, it was also found to have positively impacted learning behaviours with the learners being receptive to the changes and gaining more confidence with independently learning. There is a vast potential that can still be evaluated for the application of metacognitive strategies with other level of learners for acquiring appropriate listening skills in the English language.
Contribution/ Originality