The International Journal of Biotechnology

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Online ISSN: 2306-6148
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Comparing Patatin Class I and Camv 35s Promoters in Expression of Human Calcitonin Gene in Potato (Solanum Tuberosum Cvs. Kardal And Marfona)

Pages: 52-61
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Comparing Patatin Class I and Camv 35s Promoters in Expression of Human Calcitonin Gene in Potato (Solanum Tuberosum Cvs. Kardal And Marfona)

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.57/2016.5.4/57.4.52.61

Fatemeh Ghorbaniparsa , Hamideh Ofoghi

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(2016). Comparing Patatin Class I and Camv 35s Promoters in Expression of Human Calcitonin Gene in Potato (Solanum Tuberosum Cvs. Kardal And Marfona). The International Journal of Biotechnology, 5(4): 52-61. DOI: 10.18488/journal.57/2016.5.4/57.4.52.61
Calcitonin (CT), a 32 amino acid polypeptide hormone is a powerful and specific inhibitor of bone resorption and is used to treat several human diseases like hypercalcemia and osteoporosis. To date, many pharmaceutical proteins of mammalian origin have been synthesized in plants. To increase the production level of heterologous proteins in plants, strategies such as choice of stronger promoters and optimization of codon usage are of major concern. In this study, a human calcitonin (hCT) gene, driven by two different promoters (Patatin Class I and Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S) was expressed in two types of potato's cultivars (cvs) Kardal and Marfona plants, using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgenic plants were analyzed by molecular methods and hCT concentration was determined by quantitative EASIA. The results showed the localization of hCT production in Kardal potato tubers led to 0.7% of total soluble proteins whiles total soluble protein was 0.2% when CaMV 35S promoter was deployed, these results of Marfona when used Patatin Class I and Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoters were 0.3% of the total soluble protein and 0.1% of the total soluble protein in the respect. Data were analyzed by SPSS software using analytical statistics. There was significant difference in mean score of hCT production when two different promoters and two different cultivars were used. These results showed that organ specific expression in potato led to nearly 3 fold higher hCT accumulation than constitutive expression and Kardal cultivar expressed hCT about 2 times higher than Marfona cultivar.
Contribution/ Originality
The paper's primary contribution is finding that the expression of foreign gene under the control of organ specific promoter is more than constitutive promoter in transgenic potato. This study is one of very few studies which have investigated on the effect of two different potato plant cultivars for heterologous gene expression level.

Review of Biological Impacts of Genetically Engineered Crops and Neonicotinoid Treated Seed Use on Staten Island

Pages: 62-68
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Review of Biological Impacts of Genetically Engineered Crops and Neonicotinoid Treated Seed Use on Staten Island

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.57/2016.5.4/57.4.62.68

Sintayehu Admas

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(2016). Review of Biological Impacts of Genetically Engineered Crops and Neonicotinoid Treated Seed Use on Staten Island. The International Journal of Biotechnology, 5(4): 62-68. DOI: 10.18488/journal.57/2016.5.4/57.4.62.68
Genetically modified organism (GMO) crops particularly Roundup Ready Crops have been widely used in commercial agriculture in the United States in general and Staten Island in particular. However, its use has promoted concerns about the potential environmental effects of this technology. Therefore, this work was initiated to review impact of GE crops and Neonicotinoid to biodiversity, special focus on bees, birds, and super weeds development at Satan Island. Glyphosate herbicide is now widely used for growing Roundup Ready crop, like maize and soy bean. Scientists reported that using glyphosate herbicide by far better than using the previously used herbicide to the environment and biodiversity. It is also known that super weed may develop through gene flow from Roundup Ready Crops to its wild relatives and develop resistance against roundup. However, this might not be a problem in Staten Island where there is no wild relative species for widely grown Roundup Ready Crops like corn and alfaalfa.With regards to Neonicotinoids, it has lower toxicity to mammals like birds, and fish than other non-target insect species specially bees and other pollinator. The effect of Neonicotinoids to non-target species can be minimized using Fluent Agent in seed coating the which reduces dust contamination. Therefore, the use of Genetically Engineered Crops and Neonicotinoid Treated Seed needs special care and management in order to minimize its damage to non-target insect species.
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