Quarterly Journal of Econometrics Research

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Online ISSN: 2411-0523
Print ISSN: 2518-2536
Total Citation: 4

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Panel Data Analysis of the Impact of Economic Freedom as Well as Economic Conditions, The Quality of Life, and Public Education Spending on U.S. Undocumented Immigrant Settlement Patterns

Pages: 28-41
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Panel Data Analysis of the Impact of Economic Freedom as Well as Economic Conditions, The Quality of Life, and Public Education Spending on U.S. Undocumented Immigrant Settlement Patterns

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.88/2016.2.2/88.2.28.41

Richard J. Cebula

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(2016). Panel Data Analysis of the Impact of Economic Freedom as Well as Economic Conditions, The Quality of Life, and Public Education Spending on U.S. Undocumented Immigrant Settlement Patterns. Quarterly Journal of Econometrics Research, 2(2): 28-41. DOI: 10.18488/journal.88/2016.2.2/88.2.28.41
This study seeks to identify key factors influencing the geographic settlement pattern of undocumented immigrants in the U.S., with a particular emphasis on the impact of economic freedom, and to extend the OLS findings in previous related studies. Indeed, this study adds to the literature in several ways. First, it provides current insights into the link between the settlement patterns of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. and economic freedom. Second, the study adopts a panel data-set and provides estimates using cross-section fixed-effects. Third, this study also endeavors to provide further insights into the impacts on the settlement patterns of undocumented immigrants of non-economic-freedom economic conditions, as well as the quality of life and spending on primary and secondary public education.  The various state fixed-effects estimates provided in the present study yield several conclusions. In particular, according to these estimations, the settlement pattern of undocumented immigrants in the U.S is inversely a function of colder climates, higher crime rates, higher population density, and a higher cost of living. In addition, the interstate distribution of undocumented immigrants to the U.S. is positively a function of the annual per pupil outlays on public primary and secondary education; it is also positively a function of the degree of economic freedom, the principal focus of this study.
Contribution/ Originality
This study contributes to the literature by providing contemporary insights into the factors influencing settlement patterns of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. using panel data. It is also one of the few studies to examine the influences of economic freedom and primary and secondary public school outlays.

Dynamics of Inflation, Economic Growth, Money Supply and Exchange Rate in India: Evidence from Multivariate Analysis

Pages: 42-54
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Dynamics of Inflation, Economic Growth, Money Supply and Exchange Rate in India: Evidence from Multivariate Analysis

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DOI: 10.18488/journal.88/2016.2.2/88.2.42.54

Jaganath Behera

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(2016). Dynamics of Inflation, Economic Growth, Money Supply and Exchange Rate in India: Evidence from Multivariate Analysis. Quarterly Journal of Econometrics Research, 2(2): 42-54. DOI: 10.18488/journal.88/2016.2.2/88.2.42.54
The present study investigates the dynamics of inflation, GDP and exchange rate and money supply in India for the period 1975-2012. The data source is cumulated from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Handbook of Statistics 2012. The empirical findings of the study show that there is a long-run equilibrium relationship exist among the variables. The result also suggest that money supply has a positive effect on GDP growth in India. The result of error correction indicates that correct and negative sign for Gross Domestic Product and exchange rate. The behavior of GDP implies there is no problem of adjustment in the long run in case of shocks in the short run. The VECM Granger causality confirms that unidirectional causality from GDP to inflation and exchange rate to inflation. The result also found that exchange rate Granger causes both GDP and money supply at 10 percent level of significance. The impulse response result shows that GDP has a positive response to money supply from the occurrence to the end of the period. Whereas the response of exchange rate to money supply negative in the whole lag period. The variance decomposition result explainss that no significant part of variance is caused by money supply. The result also reveals that cyclical variance of GDP caused by money supply, exchange rate, and inflation.
Contribution/ Originality
This study is one of very few studies which has investigated the growth inflation relationship in the context of India in a new approach using VAR model.